LEED Green Building Certification

Cooler Connection

Green Building Certification – LEED

Green design in buildings has increased rapidly in the last few years due to the increase in energy costs. To help centralize the green building criteria, the non-profit U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) developed core principles for residential and commercial buildings that are designed to lower operating costs, reduce waste, reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions, and conserve energy.  The USGBC developed LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), a rating system that serves as a third-party certification program. The numeric -point driven program evaluates a building’s total environmental performance. The number of points earned for a project determines the LEED certification level of the building. Buildings, not individual products, attain LEED certification based on the number of credits earned

U.S. Cooler offers several products to assist our customers in meeting the requirements for LEED certification.

LEED FAQs

What is LEED?

LEED is an internationally recognized green building certification system developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). LEED is a 3rd party verification system that certifies that a building or community was designed and built to improve energy savings, water efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions. This program provides the marketplace with a framework for identifying and implementing green building design and construction.

How does LEED work?

LEED is a point based system where building projects earn points for satisfying specific green building criteria. There are seven LEED credit categories that projects must satisfy to earn points towards the LEED certification. The number of points the project earns determines the level of LEED certification the project receives. LEED certification is available in four levels according to the following point structure:

There are 100 base points; 6 possible Innovation in Design and 4 Regional Priority points

Certified              40-49 points

Silver                     50-59 points

Gold                      60-79 points

Platinum              80 points and above

The allocation of points is based upon positive impacts on energy efficiency and CO2 reductions.

Regional credits acknowledge the importance of local conditions. LEED projects can earn bonus points for implementing green strategies that address the important environmental issues in the respected region.

What types of buildings could use LEED?

LEED certification is available for all building types including new construction and major renovation, existing buildings and commercial interiors.

Are there specific products that can help me achieve LEED certification?

No. Individual products are not certified for LEED usage; LEED applies to the entire project.  However, in order to meet LEED requirements products will need to have certain characteristics to achieve points for certification. There are certain elements of the LEED process that require specific product performance data to attain certification.

How much does LEED certification cost?

USGBC charges a registration fee per project of $450 for USGBC members and $600 for nonmembers. Fees for certification vary by project size but the average certification cost is about $2,000.

How do I get a project LEED certified?

The U.S. Green Building Certification Institute administers the certification process through a network of third-party certification professionals. To begin the registration process, visit www.gbci.org.

Sources: U.S. Green Building Council http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CategoryID=19

Heatcraft Refrigeration http://www.heatcraftrpd.com/res/pdf/61435_HRP_Take-the-LEED.pdf

Cooler Connection @ Cooler Connection | Foodservice Blog Walk-in Refrigerators Coolers FreezersThe original is here: Cooler Connection

ASHRAE 2009 Winter Conference – Chicago, IL

I had the opportunity to attend the 2009 ASHRAE Winter Conference which was held in Chicago at the end of January. Attending the conference made me realize exactly how big the society really is. There are a total of 172 chapters within 14 regions worldwide. I am a member of the New York chapter and am the President of ASHRAE student club at City College of New York. I attended the conference with Emmanuel Hirakis from TCI College.

On Sunday January 25th we both met with students from all over the world at the Student Breakfast in the Palmer House Hilton Hotel. The President of ASHRAE Mr. William A. Harrison made the official introduction to the convention and emphasized embracing and delivering ASHRAE sustainability promises. The president, among others, spoke about the benefits of joining ASHRAE and the advantages of starting a HVAC career in the sales field. The 2008 Student Design Competition winners were also awarded during the morning session. The following colleges took first place awards:

System Design Category: 1st Place: ChulalongkornUniversity

System Selection Category: 1st Place: Pennsylvania State University

Architectural Design Category: 1st Place: University of Kansas

Following the introductions and awards, we had a two hour interactive session which was facilitated by Mr. Stephen Gray. Mr. Gray is the Director of Parent and Student Services at East Carolina University and has been working with college students most of his life. He gave us an opportunity mingle and introduce ourselves to hundreds of students attending the conference ? this was done in the form of fun tasks carried out by teams of 15 students. This experience enabled us to network with other students from the US and various parts of the world. Within two hours of his presentation Mr. Gray had vividly strengthened our team building and networking skills.

The morning session ended with a Q&A session with a panel of young engineers with few years of experience in the industry. Students asked what motivated them to get involved in ASHRAE ? engineers answered that the biggest incentives were networking and the opportunities to learn from more experienced members. Another question was about LEED standards and how they are being implemented in the companies that they work for. Bo Troumasi (Brandt Engineering Dallas, TX) agreed that “?LEED is hard to enforce, but it is getting stronger and stronger. Sustainability is where we are headed in the future and LEED is the way of quantifying it?”. Another question from the audience was about the biggest surprise after joining the industry. Dunstan Macauley (PE Encon Group Inc. Kensington MD) honestly admitted that he didn’t know a lot about HVAC but learned along the way. He said “?College prepares you how to work systematically to find the answers, however I found it extremely useful to go back to professors and use contacts made in college trough ASHRAE society?”

In the afternoon we took technical trip to Energy Star rated 300S. Wacker Drive Office Building. The goal of the trip was to show us ways of improving energy efficiency in large office buildings. Property managers of the skyscraper on Wacker Drive used a combination of an energy-tracking system provided by ComEd, steamguard retrofits, and conservation strategy to reduce the annual gas consumption by an average of 10.2 percent and electric consumption by approximately 5 percent.

On Monday we attended the 61st AHREXPO®, held at Chicago’s McCormick Place. The event was among its biggest and best of all-time. More than 54,000 registered HVAC/R professionals (including nearly 35,000 attendees and over 19,000 exhibitor personnel) filled the aisles looking for the latest products and technologies on display from more than 1,900 exhibiting companies during the industry’s largest HVAC/R event.

The 2009 show was larger than last year’s very successful New York show and now ranks as the second largest AHREXPO, just behind the 2006 Chicago Show in terms of the number of exhibiting companies (1,911). The 2009 event also ranks as the fourth largest AHREXPO of all-time in terms of square footage (396,048 net square feet). Other impressive figures included:

* 34,973 attendees

* 19,095 exhibitor personnel

* 5,383 international attendees

* 383 exhibiting companies from outside the U.S.

Many participants as well as show management were very pleased with the quantity and quality of attendees, especially given the current economic conditions.

Green Technology in our Homes, first in a series.

Many innovative ideas and inventions are being developed thanks to the green revolution and there are also many techniques, technologies and design concepts that have been used successfully for centuries all over the globe. From passive heating and cooling to green walls we are increasingly becoming more aware of these smart designs through the use of LEED® or Green Building guidelines in America.

One interesting design is called the earth tube and while it is very simple and effective it can be a challenge to incorporate into any design or retrofit. The concept is based on the fact that the earth under your feet stays at a very stable temperature all year around, basically the earth at just a few feet down will mimic the average annual temperature for any particular area.

The idea is to simply lay thin wall pipes buried in the ground and circulate air through these pipes to either gain heat from or lose heat to the earth around the pipes. Pretty simple and effective but not very easy to implement and there are some concerns for possible condensation collecting in the pipes resulting in mold growth.

This same design is used all over the world today in the form of a ground source or geo-thermal heat pump, instead of air the system circulates water through smaller pipes and just like the earth tubes the water either gains heat from or loses heat to the earth around it. Highly efficient but can be expensive in initial up front cost. One word of caution, the technology is not well known so many contractors get in over their heads when selling and installing these systems and this leads to an undeserved bad reputation for the systems in general.

In essence we are all standing on a very large heat exchanger, free to use and completely sustainable, now that is a green concept. Granted, you will still use energy to circulate that water and convert it into something useful such as hot and cold air but the actual energy used is much less than any conventional system and well worth looking at if you have the budget for it.

Ameri-Serv @ Ameri-Serv Inc. ASI Heating and Cooling Green Informational BLOGOriginal post: Ameri-Serv

Green Technology in our Homes – Geo Thermal and Earth Tubes

Boise, Idaho – July 5, 2009
Many innovative ideas and inventions are being developed thanks to the green revolution and there are also many techniques, technologies and design concepts that have been used successfully for centuries all over the globe. From passive heating and cooling to green walls we are increasingly becoming more aware of these smart designs through the use of LEED® or Green Building guidelines in America.

One interesting design is called the earth tube and while it is very simple and effective it can be a challenge to incorporate into any design or retrofit. The concept is based on the fact that the earth under your feet stays at a very stable temperature all year around, basically the earth at just a few feet down will mimic the average annual temperature for any particular area.Image courtesy of

www.greencontractors.us/archives.cfm

The idea is to simply lay thin wall pipes buried in the ground and circulate air through these pipes to either gain heat from or lose heat to the earth around the pipes. Pretty simple and effective but not very easy to implement and there are some concerns for possible condensation collecting in the pipes resulting in mold growth.

This same design is used all over the world today in the form of a ground source or geo-thermal heat pump, instead of air the system circulates water through smaller pipes and just like the earth tubes the water either gains heat from or loses heat to the earth around it. Highly efficient but can be expensive in initial up front cost. One word of caution, the technology is not well known so many contractors get in over their heads when selling and installing these systems and this leads to an undeserved bad reputation for the systems in general.