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Gas Furnace Types HVAC

Gas Furnace Types This Gas Fired Unit Heater Serves a Large Open Area Gas furnaces come in a variety of sizes and can be used for different applications. By and large, the most common gas furnaces use natural gas and utilize electronic ignition. Electronic ignition gas furnaces are slowly replacing the older style standing pilot furnaces where a pilot light remained lit all the time. Now, with the newer modern electronic ignition, gas furnaces only use gas when there is an actual call for heat. This adds efficiency because with the older standing pilot gas furnace the pilot remained on even in the summer months. While the heat produced by a standing pilot light is negligible, it is still added heat to the system in the summer when the whole purpose in the summer is to remove the heat from the system rather than add heat like a standing pilot would do. A gas furnace is rated for efficiency by AFUE or Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency rating

A New Way to Drill For Geothermal Energy

Potter Drilling has launched the next phase of research into their technique for drilling to hot rock for geothermal heat energy.  With financial backing from Google getting the science past early work using air, Potter has crossed the development threshold to draw more funding. The new drilling technique that uses superheated steam instead of air is being tested this year.  The technique relies on superheated steam to drill through the hard crystalline rocks that contain geothermal heat. The method for generating the superheated steam was developed by Oxford Catalysts, based in the UK. Dave Wardle, business development director for Instant Steam technology at Oxford Catalysts, said current drilling techniques are laborious and use rotating drill bits to cut through the rock.  “With crystalline rock you wear out the drill bits very fast,’ he said. ‘This new technology provides a chemical way of cutting rock at reasonably fast speed. There are no moving parts.” The system works with a catalyst developed by Oxford Catalysts and a special drilling tool designed by Potter Drilling

Oil Consumption Impacted More by Price than Deteriorating Economic Conditions

The fall in oil consumption was most dramatic following the escalating price of crude oil to $145.16 per barrel on July 14, 2008 then at any other point over the last several years. Price elasticity, a key concept in Economics 101, which measures the impact of price change to changes in unit volume sold, is helpful in determining which products have readily available substitutes or which, like oil are inelastic with no real substitutes. As illustrated by Benjamin Graham and David Dodd in their book Security Analysis, 1940 edition, during the 1930’s the economy had a dramatic impact on spending and consumption particularly on discretionary items such as travel. In one illustration, the change in demand was most pronounced in railroad revenues where tickets purchased for railroad travel, declined 51% from 1929 to 1993 as measured by gross receipts for the railroad industry. Over this same period, spending on the consumer staples (inelastic demand), such as electricity encountered a decline of only 9%. While almost everyone would agree that the current economic climate is one of the most challenging since the 1930’s, a quick review of oil consumption over the last several years illustrates that demand has not significantly contracted, suggesting driving habits only changed when prices escalated to over $100 per barrel. Oil consumption dropped only 4.9% from January 2008 through January 2009.

A Bite of Reality for Climate Science

Roger Pielke Sr. wrote on June 4th 2009 a short piece on how “climate science” papers, if there is such a reputable thing, are short circuiting the scientific method so causing falsehoods and a dangerous trend in science that deserves attention from taxpayers, grantors and others interested in good science, properly done, factually accurate and useful for humankind. Pielke points out, as others and I have in the past that much if not all the “climate science” is based in assumptions and built out using computer modeling.  No experimentation is done.  No testing, no verifiable conclusions, no facts. But Pielke goes a little further, he’s calling to account the publishers of the “climate science” to adhere to the minimum standards of the scientific method.  With peer review responsibilities on his resume’ Pielke has good reason to see the problems of credibility when peer review journals and the following media rush to print sensationalism rather than science. I repeat here again, a computer model is not a fact.  The reliance on computers, programs and the assumptions or data input is only, at best, a speculation.  Pielke offers the six steps common to describing the scientific method condensed by sciencebuddies.org as: Ask a question Do background research Construct a hypothesis Test the hypothesis with experimentation Analyze the data for conclusions Communicate the results But today, the peer review publishers are short-circuiting the scientific method.  Having read a few it’s much more like: pose a conclusion, construct a hypothesis, prove it with your computer and press release your results.  Its insulting, to the informed readers, the scientific institutions providing the resources and others researching properly