HVAC Water Chillers and Cooling Towers: Fundamentals, Application, and Operation

HVAC Water Chillers and Cooling Towers provides fundamental principles and practical techniques for the design, application, purchase, operation, and maintenance of water chillers and cooling towers. Written by a leading expert in the field, the book analyzes topics such as piping, water treatment, noise control, electrical service, and energy efficiency for optimal system and equipment performance and offers extensive checklists, troubleshooting strategies, and reference data, as well as recommended specifications for the procurement of new or replacement equipment.

HVAC Water Chillers and Cooling Towers Fundamentals, Application, and Operation

by Marcel Dekker

This reference also discusses proper installation and placement of chillers and cooling towers, start-up, and capacity.

Click To Download a PDF copy
[ad#ads234x60t]
HVAC Water Chillers and Cooling Towers

Buy a print copy from Amazon:

HVAC Water Chillers and Cooling Towers: Fundamentals, Application, and Operation (Mechanical Engineering)

Price: $1,744.78

3.2 out of 5 stars (4 customer reviews)

8 used & new available from $125.00

LEED Green Building Certification

Cooler Connection

Green Building Certification – LEED

Green design in buildings has increased rapidly in the last few years due to the increase in energy costs. To help centralize the green building criteria, the non-profit U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) developed core principles for residential and commercial buildings that are designed to lower operating costs, reduce waste, reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions, and conserve energy.  The USGBC developed LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), a rating system that serves as a third-party certification program. The numeric -point driven program evaluates a building’s total environmental performance. The number of points earned for a project determines the LEED certification level of the building. Buildings, not individual products, attain LEED certification based on the number of credits earned

U.S. Cooler offers several products to assist our customers in meeting the requirements for LEED certification.

LEED FAQs

What is LEED?

LEED is an internationally recognized green building certification system developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). LEED is a 3rd party verification system that certifies that a building or community was designed and built to improve energy savings, water efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions. This program provides the marketplace with a framework for identifying and implementing green building design and construction.

How does LEED work?

LEED is a point based system where building projects earn points for satisfying specific green building criteria. There are seven LEED credit categories that projects must satisfy to earn points towards the LEED certification. The number of points the project earns determines the level of LEED certification the project receives. LEED certification is available in four levels according to the following point structure:

There are 100 base points; 6 possible Innovation in Design and 4 Regional Priority points

Certified              40-49 points

Silver                     50-59 points

Gold                      60-79 points

Platinum              80 points and above

The allocation of points is based upon positive impacts on energy efficiency and CO2 reductions.

Regional credits acknowledge the importance of local conditions. LEED projects can earn bonus points for implementing green strategies that address the important environmental issues in the respected region.

What types of buildings could use LEED?

LEED certification is available for all building types including new construction and major renovation, existing buildings and commercial interiors.

Are there specific products that can help me achieve LEED certification?

No. Individual products are not certified for LEED usage; LEED applies to the entire project.  However, in order to meet LEED requirements products will need to have certain characteristics to achieve points for certification. There are certain elements of the LEED process that require specific product performance data to attain certification.

How much does LEED certification cost?

USGBC charges a registration fee per project of $450 for USGBC members and $600 for nonmembers. Fees for certification vary by project size but the average certification cost is about $2,000.

How do I get a project LEED certified?

The U.S. Green Building Certification Institute administers the certification process through a network of third-party certification professionals. To begin the registration process, visit www.gbci.org.

Sources: U.S. Green Building Council http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CategoryID=19

Heatcraft Refrigeration http://www.heatcraftrpd.com/res/pdf/61435_HRP_Take-the-LEED.pdf

Cooler Connection @ Cooler Connection | Foodservice Blog Walk-in Refrigerators Coolers FreezersThe original is here: Cooler Connection

SCHOTT-Gemtron Announces CrossFire LED Lighting at T-8 Pricing

Cooler Connection

Tim Dye, Director of Sales and Marketing of SCHOTT Gemtron announced today that Tundra™, Sierra™, and Polar™ door models will be offered with CrossFire™ LED lighting at standard T-8 pricing. Dye stated, “SCHOTT Gemtron continues to lead the industry by being the first glass door manufacturer to provide LED technology at this price level.” Dye continued by stating, “LED lighting has been a solution for our customers for the last 5 years, and now we are making it even more affordable.”

CrossFire™ LED lighting has proven to be the solution for the harsh cold environments of the commercial refrigeration industry. This lighting is the perfect application for Super Markets, Convenience Stores, Buying Clubs, Drug Stores, and any other retailer that utilizes glass display doors in their merchandising endeavors.convenience store cooler

Dye also stated, “With this major price reduction all retailers can utilize this technology and feel confident that they are maximizing their sales efforts.”

CrossFire™ LED offers over 1600 lux to the center of the shelf while using as little as 15 watts per opening (door). The CrossFire™ LED system is backed by the industry leading 5 year warranty and will supply over 75,000 hours of unparalleled performance.

Tundra™ – Energy-Free Performance for Normal-Temperature Environments
SCHOTT Gemtron’s Tundra™ door system is perfect for energy conscious retailers-combining practical features such as energy efficiency and low maintenance with an attractive design that protects against condensation up to 74% relative humidity. Built for normal-temperature environments, Tundra™ delivers rugged, durable, reliable performance. Standard CrossFire™ LED lighting, black or white post.

Sierra™ – A Clear Advantage for High-Humidity Environments
For the most demanding normal-temperature conditions, Sierra™ doors and frames offer a clear advantage: standard CrossFire™ LED Lighting, excellent visibility and guaranteed performance. Designed for high-humidity applications, SCHOTT Gemtron’s Sierra™ product line ensures optimal merchandise displays under the toughest conditions.

Polar™ – The High-Performing Solution for Low-Temperature Applications
In low-temperature environments, retailers are looking for high performance, durable construction, and exceptional energy efficiency-and Polar™ door systems from SCHOTT Gemtron were developed with these real-world needs in mind. With industry-leading product features, such as standard CrossFire™ LED lighting, Polar™ sets the standard for low temperature displays.

About SCHOTT Gemtron Corporation

SCHOTT Gemtron Corporation (Sweetwater, Tenn.) is a joint venture of AGC Flat Glass North America, Inc. and the majority shareholder SCHOTT. AGC is a subsidiary of Asahi Glass Co. Ltd., one of the world’s largest float-glass organizations. SCHOTT is a technology-driven, international group that sees its core purpose as the lasting improvement of living and working conditions through special materials and high-tech solutions. SCHOTT’s Flat Glass business has operations in Europe, Asia, South America, and North America, with SCHOTT Gemtron serving North American customers.

SCHOTT Gemtron Corporation is a leading manufacturer and fabricator of glass, metal and molded components for the commercial refrigeration industry. Through expert solutions and close collaboration with customers, SCHOTT Gemtron Corporation delivers a steady stream of innovation and value to its worldwide customers and partners.

This article has been provided courtesy of SCHOTT Gemtron Corporation.

Cooler Connection @ Cooler Connection | Foodservice Blog Walk-in Refrigerators Coolers FreezersPost written by: Cooler Connection

Preventative Maintenance for Refrigeration Systems

Cooler Connection

Suggested Refrigeration Systems Preventative Maintenance

Refrigeration systems are critical in the foodservice industry. It is very important to provide maintenance on your cooling systems to help prevent them from clogging or breaking down, which could lead to spoiled food, rotten food, etc. The following guidelines are provided from Heatcraft’s Operation & Instruction Manual.   By following these preventive maintenance steps, it does not guarantee your unit will not break down. However, by taking care and maintaining your refrigeration systems your unit is less likely to have problems.

Preventive Maintenance

Unit Coolers

At every six month interval, or sooner if local conditions cause clogging or fouling of air passages through the finned surface, the following items should be checked.

1) Visually inspect unit

• Look for signs of corrosion on fins, cabinet, copper tubing and solder joints.

• Look for excessive or unusual vibration for fan blades or sheet metal panels when in operation. Identify fan cell(s) causing vibration and check motor and blade carefully.

• Look for oil stains on headers, return bends, and coil fins. Check any suspect areas with an electronic leak detector.

• Check drain pan to insure that drain is clear of debris, obstructions or ice buildup and is free draining.

2) Clean evaporator coil and blades

• Periodic cleaning can be accomplished by using a brush, pressurized water or a commercially available evaporator coil cleaner or mild detergent. Never use an acid based cleaner. Follow label directions for appropriate use. Be sure the product you use is approved for use in your particular application.

• Flush and rinse coil until no residue remains.

• Pay close attention to drain pan, drain line and trap.

3) Check the operation of all fans and ensure airflow is unobstructed

• Check that each fan rotates freely and quietly. Replace any fan motor that does not rotate smoothly or makes an unusual noise.

• Check all fan set screws and tighten if needed.

• Check all fan blades for signs of stress or wear. Replace any blades that are worn, cracked or bent.

• Verify that all fan motors are securely fastened to the motor rail.

• Lubricate motors if applicable.

4) Inspect electrical wiring and components

• Visually inspect all wiring for wear, kinks, bare areas and discoloration. Replace any wiring found to be damaged.

• Verify that all electrical and ground connections are secure, tighten if necessary.

• Check operation/calibration of all fan cycle and defrost controls when used.

• Look for abnormal accumulation of ice patterns and adjust defrost cycles accordingly

• Compare actual defrost heater amp draw against unit data plate.

• Visually inspect heaters to ensure even surface contact with the coil. If heaters have crept, decrease defrost termination temperature and be sure you have even coil frost patterns. Re-align heaters as needed.

• Check drain line heat tape for proper operation (supplied and installed by others).

5) Refrigeration Cycle

• Check unit cooler superheat and compare reading for your specific application

• Visually inspect coil for even distribution

Air Cooled Condensing Units

Quarterly

1) Visually inspect unit

• Look for signs of oil stains on interconnection piping and condenser coil. Pay close attention to areas around solder joints, building penetrations and pipe clamps. Check any suspect areas with an electronic leak detector. Repair any leaks found and add refrigerant as needed.

• Check condition of moisture indicator/sightglass in the sight glass if so equipped. Replace liquid line drier if there is indication of slight presence of moisture. Replace refrigerant, oil and drier if moisture concentration is indicated to be high.

• Check moisture indicator/sightglass for flash gas. If found check entire system for refrigerant leaks and add refrigerant as needed after repairing any leaks.

• Check compressor sightglass (if equipped) for proper oil level.

• Check condition of condenser. Look for accumulation of dirt and debris (clean as required).

• Check for unusual noise or vibration. Take corrective action as required.

• Inspect wiring for signs of wear or discoloration and repair if needed.

• Check and tighten all flare connections.

Semi-Annually

2) Repeat all quarterly inspection items.

3) Clean condenser coil and blades

• Periodic cleaning can be accomplished by using a brush, pressurized water and a commercially available foam coil cleaner. If foam cleaner is used, it should not be an acid based cleaner. Follow label directions for appropriate use.

• Rinse until no residue remains.

4) Check operation of condenser fans

• Check that each fan rotates freely and quietly. Replace any fan motor that does not rotate smoothly or makes excessive noise.

• Check all fan blade set screws and tighten as required.

• Check all fan blades for signs of cracks, wear or stress. Pay close attention to the hub and spider. Replace blades as required.

• Verify that all motors are mounted securely.

• Lubricate motors if applicable. Do not lubricate permanently sealed, ball bearing motors.

5) Inspect electrical wiring and components

• Verify that all electrical and ground connections are secure, tighten as required.

• Check condition of compressor and heater contactors. Look for discoloration and pitting. Replace as required.

• Check operation and calibration of all timers, relays pressure controls and safety controls.

• Clean electrical cabinet. Look for signs of moisture, dirt, debris, insects and wildlife. Take corrective action as required.

• Verify operation of crankcase heater by measuring amp draw.

6) Check refrigeration cycle

• Check suction, discharge and net oil pressure readings. If abnormal take appropriate action.

• Check operation of demand cooling, liquid injection or unloaders if so equipped.

• Check pressure drop across all filters and driers. Replace as required.

• Verify that superheat at the compressor conforms to specification. (30°F to 45°F)

• Check pressure and safety control settings and verify proper operation.

Annually

7) In addition to quarterly and semiannual maintenance checks, submit an oil sample for analysis

• Look for high concentrations of acid or moisture. Change oil and driers until test results read normal.

• Investigate source of high metal concentrations, which normally are due to abnormal bearing wear. Look for liquid refrigerant in the crankcase, low oil pressure or low superheat as a possible source.

8) Inspect suction accumulator (if equipped)

• If the accumulator is insulated remove insulation and inspect for leaks and corrosion.

• Pay close attention to all copper to steel brazed connections

• Wire brush all corroded areas and peeling paint.

• Apply an anticorrosion primer and paint as required. Re-insulate if applicable.

Air Cooled Condensers and Fluid Coolers

At every six month interval, or sooner if local conditions cause clogging or fouling of air passages through the finned surface, the following items should be checked.

1) Visually inspect unit

• Look for signs of corrosion on fins, cabinet, copper tubing and solder joints.

• Look for excessive or unusual vibration for fan blades or sheet metal panels when in operation. Identify fan cell(s) causing vibration and check motor and blade carefully.

• Look for oil stains on headers, return bends, and coil fins. Check any suspect areas with an electronic leak detector.

2) Clean condenser coil and blades

• Periodic cleaning can be accomplished by using brush, pressurized water or a commercially available coil cleaning foam. If a foam cleaner is used, it should not be an acid based cleaner. Follow label directions for appropriate use.

• Clear unnecessary trash and debris away from condenser.

3) Check the operation of all fans

• Check that each fan rotates freely and quietly. Replace any fan motor that does not rotate smoothly or makes an unusual noise.

• Check all fan set screws and tighten if needed.

• Check all fan blades for signs of stress or wear. Replace any blades that are worn, cracked or bent.

• Verify that all fan motors are securely fastened to the motor rail.

• Lubricate motors if applicable (most Heatcraft condenser motors are permanently sealed ball bearing type and do not require lubrication)

4) Inspect electrical wiring and components

• Visually inspect all wiring for wear, kinks, bare areas and discoloration. Replace any wiring found to be damaged.

• Verify that all electrical and ground connections are secure, tighten if necessary.

• Check operation/calibration of all fan cycle controls when used.

General Safety Information:

  1. Installation and maintenance to be performed only by qualified personnel who are familiar with this type of equipment.
  2. Some units are pressurized with dry air or inert gas. All units must be evacuated before charging the system with refrigeration.
  3. Make sure that all field wiring conforms to the requirements of the equipment and all applicable national and local lodes.
  4. Avoid contact with sharp edges and coil surfaces. They are a potential injury hazard.
  5. Make sure all power sources are disconnected before any service work is done on the units.

The above refrigeration Preventative Maintenance Tips are located starting on pages 38-39 of Heatcraft’s Installation and Operation Manual. More walk-in refrigeration customer service information is available on Heatcraft’s website at http://www.heatcraftrpd.com/.

Cooler Connection @ Cooler Connection | Foodservice Blog Walk-in Refrigerators Coolers FreezersPost written by: Cooler Connection